What Abnormalities Or Changes In Your Pet's Behavior Should YouBe Aware Of?

 


Abnormalities or changes in your pet's behavior can be caused by either changes in the family, stress, or the effects of disease and aging on any organ in the body, including the brain. Changes in eating habits, sleeping habits, and activity levels may be the first signs of an emerging health problem. So what changes in your pet's behavior should you pay close attention to?


Your pet's behavior

Abnormalities or changes in your pet's behavior can be caused by either changes in the family, stress, or the effects of disease and aging on any organ in the body, including the brain. Changes in eating habits, sleeping habits, and activity levels may be the first signs of an emerging health problem. So what changes in your pet's behavior should you pay close attention to?


Behavior changes in dogs

Dogs don't speak our language, but it's amazing how well we can communicate with each other! However, there are some behavioral changes that occur with dogs, which may go unnoticed due to their subtlety. Remember that dogs are very hardy animals, so even if the change seems small to you, it could indicate a major problem for your dog! Among these changes:


Sudden Aggression:

Dogs do not become aggressive overnight without there being a major underlying problem. The older your dog gets without appearing aggressive before, the more worrisome her appearance should be! While aggression is often a training problem, it can also be caused by medical conditions, for example, brain tumors or seizures can create aggressive behavior that has never been seen before. 

If your dog is in pain, he may be able to tell you just by biting when you touch the area that hurts. 

Sometimes, hearing or vision loss can make your dog feel more vulnerable, so they appear aggressive out of fear. 

No matter what happens, aggression should not be ignored and before you call the trainer, your best bet is to get your dog checked out.


Appetite Changes:

Your dog's appetite can change for a number of reasons, many of which are medical. If you notice that your dog does not seem to feel satisfied after a meal, and is more insistent on asking for food, you will want your veterinarian to rule out the reasons behind this. Increased appetite can be caused by many diseases. On the other hand, your dog may lose his appetite completely if he feels sick.

Changes in appetite require a visit to the vet, because the causes of decreased appetite are limitless - from a simple upset stomach to a very serious illness.


Hiding:

If your dog usually greets you or your friends at the door, but suddenly avoids greeting, there is likely something to be addressed. Most dogs generally do not hide, as they are very social animals. However, your dog may be in a state of pain making him unwilling to interact with friends or family members, so you should consider a vet visit.


Lethargy:

Lethargy is always a cause for concern, especially in the case of highly active dogs. Our dogs can get tired after a big walk, like a camping trip or maybe a weekend getaway, but unusual lethargy shouldn't be ignored.


Weight changes:

Just as with people, unexpected weight changes in dogs should not be taken lightly. A sudden increase or decrease in your dog's weight should be evaluated by a veterinarian, regardless of how much he eats. 

Thyroid diseases, cancers, diabetes, kidney disease, and many more cause changes in weight. If you notice a difference, consult your veterinarian before changing your dog's diet.


Needless Panting:

Dogs pant to regulate their body temperature and we should expect them to do so. Panting during exercise or during a heat wave is normal, but panting should be considered while lying down or standing outside in cold weather. 

Dogs don't pant just to stay calm, they pant because of stress! Emotional stress, such as fear and anxiety, can cause panting in dogs. Physical stress, such as pain, will also make your dog pant. If you notice panting that you don't think is really necessary, consider seeing your vet.


Behavior changes in cats:

The process of diagnosing and treating cat behavior problems is complex and requires a meeting with a professional. Here are some unusual cat behaviors that will help you understand some of your cat's problems, but they are not a substitute for seeking professional help with a problem!


Agressive behavior:

Aggression against people may be due to fear, play-related, or predatory instincts.

But there is another type of aggression, pain aggression, which is a defensive response that occurs when the cat feels pain. This may happen when the cat expects to be moved or touched. Certain illnesses can also lead to aggression, so you should take your cat to the vet to rule out medical causes for aggression.


Defecation-related behavior problems:

Your vet will always rule out any medical problems, because many situations can cause cats to urinate or defecate outside the designated box, so your vet will ask questions about how and where accidents occurred, and litter box details (including number and location of boxes, cleaning procedures, type of litter box, etc.). Garbage). Blood and urine tests are also usually necessary to rule out health conditions.


Spraying (also called urine marking):

When a cat eliminates urine through a small stream of urine, it does so while standing, with tail raised and shivering. Urine is directed to a vertical surface, such as a wall, curtain, or door. Urine marking is more common in male cats, and neutering can help reduce or eliminate spraying behaviors in about 90% of cats. 


Changes in the behavior of older cats:

Older cats may suffer from cognitive dysfunction syndrome, which is similar to Alzheimer 's disease in people and can cause confusion, agitation, anxiety, memory loss and personality changes. If you notice behavioral changes in your older cat, make an appointment with your veterinarian , who will rule out medical conditions and develop an appropriate treatment plan.


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